Yesterday I posted my butternut squash dessert smoothie recipe but what about all that orange pulp left in your juicer? Now I don’t like things going to waste so here is my spiced butternut squash bread recipe using the leftover pulp (genius I know). I still can’t believe how good this tasted and what a great way to use all of the butternut. A seriously tasty slice that goes perfectly with a hot cup of herbal tea.

SPICED BUTTERNUT SQUASH BREAD

SPICED BUTTERNUT SQUASH BREAD

Ingredients

  • 1.5 cups gluten free flour/almond/coconut
  • 2 cups of butternut squash pulp
  • 2 eggs
  • 3/4 cup coconut sugar (I used Coconom’s ginger flavoured sugar to give it a nice spicy kick)
  • 1/4 tsp nutmeg
  • 1/4 tsp cinnamon
  • 50g butter
  • pinch himalayan rock salt
  • 1/4 tsp baking soda
  • 1/4 tsp baking powder
  • 1/2 Tbsp vanilla essence

METHOD

  1. Preheat oven to 350°F (180°C). Add all the dry ingredients together in a bowl and mix well.
  2. Mix the wet ingredients together, then combine with the dry ingredients.
  3. Pour into a well-buttered tin. You can use a loaf tin, I used a brownie one as wanted it to cook faster and be more like a slice. Bake 35-40 minutes (if using a loaf tin). Bake for 15-20min if using a flatter brownie tin. You can check if it’s cooked it by poking a skewer into the center and if it comes out clean, it’s done.
  4. Let cool on a rack. Serve with your favourite herbal infusion. I also found this was more bouncy and baked better when using a mixture of tapioca/almond blend or a gluten free flour like Dove’s Gluten Free White Self-raising Flour Blend. Yum!

My other butternut squash cooking tips

Butternut squash is such a versatile and easy winter vegetable to cook. You can roast it by cutting it up or putting in the whole squash, drizzling some olive oil on top and place it on baking tray in the oven for 45mins (longer if it’s whole), its ready when you can easily pierce it with a sharp knife. Make soup from the roasted squash or remove the skin and cut the flesh into chunks for steaming. Toast the seeds to sprinkle in salads and on top of soups or to mash the cooked flesh. I’m sure you can make many more culinary delights with it. What’s your favourite way of eating it?

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